Morning Duty p2

General Post — Inland office — Morning Duty prior to 1796.

Until 1796 the same stamps were used on morning and evening duty. This is an example of one such type, in use from 1787-1791. It is a small circular stamp with the month at the top, the year at the bottom, and the date in a circle in the centre.

1788 address panel click here for details

This letter was sent Free of charge and signed by Pelham who was the second Earl of Chichester. The date is shown as JY 21 88 with diamonds separating the month and year. It was addressed to Marmaduke Robertson Esqr, Essex Street, Strand, London. We have a separate section on Free Franks on our website.

letter contentsclick here for details
This refers to Pelham's younger brother George who held a Commission in the Guards, before changing careers to enter the Church.

Lewes Sunday

Dear Sir

I had this morning the pleasure of your letter full of very agreeable News both on my own & my Brother's Accounts. My Brother's being so fortunate as to obtain a Commission so soon, has entirely put an End to the Hesse-Cassell scheme. I should think the £140 & the £150 allowance from the Court of Chancery would be sufficient without any Additions provided the £200 for fitting out, be granted.

I mean to be in London the latter end of the week so that I shall be ready for Mr. Crawford the beginning of next Week.
I am, etc, etc
Inigo Thomas

The reference to Hesse-Cassell, is mystifying, as it is a landgraviate of Germany, with a history going back to 1567, much of it involved in warfare. However, it has links with Britain as it fought on the side of Great Britain in the Seven Years' War. Also, during the 18th century Hessian troops fought in nearly every European and Turkish campaign, and in 1776-86 as many as 17,000 Hessian mercenaries fought for the British in the American Revolution. As this letter is dated 1788, just slightly later than that, perhaps the 'Hesse Cassell Scheme' developed from this.

Copyright 2002 E. J. Shanahan

By EARS Leisurewrite
Morning Duty P.3

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